The Approach

gnarled-tree

From Scott Vanatter with permission-Copyright- Indira

There are many of my kin I admire; those whose death made history.  The Great Cedar who was cut down and shaped into a cross.  My great uncle that supported the Roman soldier named Sebastian while arrows pinned him tighter to his bark.  Others, nameless, whose bones formed ships that discovered the Americas and the Orient.

Will my death, like theirs, mean anything? Will I be turned into necklaces, icons in silver and gold?

A woman is hugging my midriff, praying that my roots hold against the monstrous cyclone approaching fast.  My prayers join hers, as I stand and wait.

Rochelle from Friday Fictioneers chose a wonderful picture for us this week by Indira.  I hope you like my story and if you wish to read other inspired stories featuring mystical foliage, scattered ashes, ancient barks and magical leaves, be sure to visit this page here.

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47 comments on “The Approach

  1. deanabo says:

    What a brilliant idea for the post. It’s amazing how something like a simple tree could hold so many different meanings for so many different people.

    • Sandra says:

      I wanted to add much more; The Cedar’s cousin who held the men swinging by a rope with 30 silver pieces at his feet; all those kin that turned to ashes as people turned to stone when the great volcano erupted…but a word limit is a word limit. Thanks a lot for your comment Deana.

  2. lfarrugia says:

    Love it girl! 🙂

  3. lfarrugia says:

    Love it girl!

  4. Great to hear the voice of the tree. Well done

  5. Refreshing to read from the perspective of a tree, and great idea to reach out to the lives of so many other trees throughout history.

  6. Nice to bring the tree to life in such a way. Many stories could be told by trees

  7. I like the idea of the tree wanting to be useful and especially like the bones of the trees being used for the ships.

    janet

  8. You show how great and mighty trees are and their great contributions. Nice work.

  9. Sandra says:

    Such a great take on the prompt. Well done.

  10. Alastair says:

    Brilliant. Love the way you have done that

  11. Shreyank says:

    A great different take on the prompt. Great to hear the thoughts of the tree 🙂

  12. We shared a view here.
    Loved your take.

  13. kz says:

    what a wonderful story this is.. you took me into the mind of a tree.. and such a great tree too, with the best intentions. and i do hope that tree and the woman survives that cyclone.

  14. elappleby says:

    Brilliant story from the point of view of the tree – some lovely phrases in there: Others, nameless, whose bones formed ships
    And a tree-hugger at the end to round it all off!
    Loved this 🙂

  15. Mystikel says:

    So creative! I like the poetic images in your prose. You must have your very own muse 🙂

    • Sandra says:

      I have a mirror right in front of my desk…Ha! sorry, way too smug. Forgive me, it’s Friday. Thanks a lot for your very kind comment.

  16. That’s a pretty introspective tree. 🙂 It’s a good take on the picture. I’d think it, if any, would be able to weather the cyclone, but maybe the bigger they are, the harder they fall.

  17. jwdwrites says:

    Nice angle on the prompt Sandra, you have got me feeling sorry for this one. Good story. 🙂

  18. Parul says:

    A different perspective, but the fears sound familiar.
    Good work!

  19. Brian Benoit says:

    Interesting to think of the tree as fearing a wasted existence, and poignant the way you literally joined it with a human at the end – both fighting the same battle. Nicely done

  20. Dear Sarah,
    Now what I call a family tree. Well told story. I enjoyed it.
    Shalom,
    Rochelle

  21. billgncs says:

    that was rich imagery with so few words

  22. Thoughts of a tree…

  23. Joe Owens says:

    More personification, one of my favorite literary ideas. I often wonder about events from different perspectives and feel like it can give writing a new feel.

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